A roadside beech colonised by Ganoderma resinaceum

Here’s a nice one! As I was out surveying, there sat this large roadside beech (Fagus sylvatica) that sported a trio of sporophores of the lacquered bracket (Ganoderma resinaceum). Curiously, this association between host tree and parasitic fungus is a not-so-common one in the present day, in comparison to this fungus upon oak (Quercus robur) – in spite of the lacquered bracket historically being more common on beech than any other tree.

Evidently, judging by the past prunung cuts, an arboriculturist made the decision to manage this beech. Whether or not it was due to the presence of this fungus is something open to speculation, though there’s certainly reason to prune this beech once more for good arboricultural reasons associated with hazard management – notably because of the busy road directly adjacent to the beech. A PiCUS test might be the best investigative route of action here, though that decision remains with the landowner.

I’m sure that you’ll be able to appreciate the issue to do with hazard management, from the pictures below!

ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-1
To give a sense of context, this is the position of the beech relative to the adjacent road.
ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-2
Some rather nice bulging on the main stem, though around the prominent buttress roots we can spot a few sporophores of Ganoderma resinaceum.
ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-3
Another fruiting body hides on the other side of the buttress!
ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-4
From the damaged bracket atop the one on the right, either we have prior years of fruiting or this bracket was torn off and another one grew in its place earlier during this growing season.
ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-5
We can observe how this significant buttress root has likely been produced in response to the white rot associated with the decay incuded by Ganoderma resinaceum.
ganoderma-resinaceum-fagus-sylvatica-roadside-6
And a final picture for good measure!
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A roadside beech colonised by Ganoderma resinaceum

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