Bridging walls for tree roots – when it actually happens, it’s beautiful

The tree is damaging my brick wall!“, they exclaim. “Fell the tree!“, they demand. Frankly, the word “no” would be sufficient, in at least a good portion of cases. After all, there’s an easy engineering solution that not only balances the need for a crack-free wall and the presence of a tree, but also signals ingenuity and a reasoned approach to situation management – the bridging of said wall around the butt of the tree and its immediatly-adjacent root plate. The issue is addressed in various publications, including Tree Roots in the Built Environment, and it is a message that needs to be communicated to homeowners and tree owners alike. More of the below, please!

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A fairly large sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) within touching distance of a low brick wall and a pathway. A recipe for disaster, surely? No! The tree can easily be retained via a simple feat of engineering, as we can see even from afar.
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Not only does the remaining wall have a much lower chance of being directly damaged by the secondary thickening of the sycamore roots, but it also saves on bricks!
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We can see how the roots sit snugly beneath the brick wall, and the tree is making itself even more cosy by girdling itself………… (?).
Bridging walls for tree roots – when it actually happens, it’s beautiful